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THE RUINS OF ANI: From Sacred Landscape to Political Soil with Peter Balakian and Aram Arkun ~ Thursday, February 27, 2020

THE RUINS OF ANI: From Sacred Landscape to Political Soil with Peter Balakian and Aram Arkun ~ Thursday, February 27, 2020

Thursday, February 27, 2020 at 7:30 pm NAASR Batmasian Hall, 395 Concord Avenue, Belmont, MA 02478 Join us in NAASR's Batmasian Hall for a presentation by Peter Balakian, editor and Aram Arkun, translator of The Ruins of Ani by Krikor Balakian.   From the tenth to the thirteenth centuries, the city of Ani was the jewel of the Armenian kingdom, renowned far and wide for its magnificent buildings. By the fifteenth century, Ani was virtually abandoned, its stunning buildings left to crumble. Yet its ruins have remained a symbol of cultural accomplishment that looms large in the Armenian imagination. Today, Ani...

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ROVING REVOLUTIONARIES: A Book Talk with Houri Berberian ~ Thursday, February 27, 2020

ROVING REVOLUTIONARIES: A Book Talk with Houri Berberian ~ Thursday, February 27, 2020

Thursday, February 27, 2020, 6:10-7:30 pm Columbia University Knox Hall, Room 208 606 W 122nd St, New York, NY 10027 Three of the formative revolutions that shook the early twentieth-century world occurred almost simultaneously in regions bordering each other. Though the Russian, Iranian, and Young Turk Revolutions all exploded between 1904 and 1911, they have never been studied through their linkages until now. Roving Revolutionaries probes the interconnected aspects of these three revolutions through the involvement of the Armenian revolutionaries—minorities in all of these empires—whose movements and participation within and across frontiers tell us a great deal about the global...

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THE HAMIDIAN MASSACRES AND THE ARMENIAN LAND QUESTION IN THE LATE OTTOMAN EMPIRE with Dr. Mehmet Polatel ~ Sunday, February 23, 2020

THE HAMIDIAN MASSACRES AND THE ARMENIAN LAND QUESTION IN THE LATE OTTOMAN EMPIRE with Dr. Mehmet Polatel ~ Sunday, February 23, 2020

Sunday, February 23, 2020, at 4:00 pm Ararat-Eskijian Museum, Sheen Chapel 15105 Mission Hills Road, Mission Hills, CA 91345 In the 1910s, the Armenian land question, which referred to the question of what would happen to the seized properties of Armenians, was one of the most debated topics in the Ottoman Empire. This talk explores the emergence and transformation of this social problem based on the Armenian, British and Ottoman sources. Scrutinizing the changes in the characteristics of actors involved in the seizure of Armenian properties, and the scale and geographical distribution of these seizures in the period between the mid-19th...

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WHEN WAS THE DECISION TO ANNIHILATE THE ARMENIANS TAKEN? A Presentation of New Research by TANER AKÇAM ~ Thursday, February 20, 2020

WHEN WAS THE DECISION TO ANNIHILATE  THE ARMENIANS TAKEN? A Presentation of New Research by TANER AKÇAM ~ Thursday, February 20, 2020

Thursday, February 20, 2020, at 7:30 pm NAASR Vartan Gregorian Building, Batmasian Hall, on the 3rd floor Reception after the program in the Shahinian SolariumIn this presentation of recent research, Taner Akçam argues that documents from the Ottoman archives in Istanbul indicate that first decision to exterminate Armenians was taken on December 1, 1914, well before most scholars have thought. Another document, a letter by Bahaettin Şakir, one of the main architects of the Armenian Genocide, written on March 3, 1915, says that the Central Committee of Union and Progress had decided to exterminate the Armenians, giving the government wide authority...

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THE UNSPOKEN AS HERITAGE with Prof. Harry Harootunian ~ Thursday, February 13, 2020

THE UNSPOKEN AS HERITAGE with Prof. Harry Harootunian ~ Thursday, February 13, 2020

Thursday, February 13, 2020, 7:00-8:30 pmWeatherhead East Asian Institute420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027Conference Room 918 (9th floor)In the 1910s historian Harry Harootunian's parents Ohannes and Vehanush escaped the mass slaughter of the Armenian genocide, making their way to France, where they first met, before settling in suburban Detroit. Although his parents rarely spoke of their families and the horrors they survived, the genocide and their parents' silence about it was a permanent backdrop to the Harootunian children's upbringing. In The Unspoken as Heritage Harootunian—for the first time in his distinguished career—turns to his personal life and family heritage...

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